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Sing a song of sixpence
2012
unknownj
I saw something on the news about how children these days are being brought up without nursery rhymes, and it questioned whether they were really important to a child's development and stuff...
Boys and girls come out to play
The moon is shining as bright as day
Leave your supper and leave your sleep
And join your playfellows in the street

Come with a whoop and come with a call
Come with a good will or not at all
Up the ladder and down the wall
A ha'penny loaf will serve us all

You find milk and I'll find flour
And we'll have pudding in half an hour
I think people misunderstand how very important childrens' stories and nursery rhymes really are. Some of the most vivid memories I have are of scenes I imagined as a child when listening to nursery rhymes. I had a book with lots of them in, and it had beautiful illustrations, and I used to imagine myself in those pictures.

And take this for example
"One two three four five, once I caught a fish alive [...] which finger did he bite, this little finger on the right"
It teaches a child to count, and teaches the concept of left and right. Old MacDonald teaches about animals, Baa Baa Black Sheep is also good for counting and the concept of sharing...

And don't even get me started on twinkle twinkle little star... When I used to hear it as a toddler, I pictured myself in a clearing in the woods, looking up at the stars, and it was beautiful. So even if old fashioned nursery rhymes are going out of fashion, I still remember every word of the ones I was taught as a child, and I'll damned well pass them on to my kids. These days, children need a good deal less TV and a lot more imagination, playing, and little songs they can have sung to them by their parents, which they'll some day learn and eventually pass on to their own kids.

Ha, and if that scares you, then you really don't want to know exactly how much thought I've given to how I'd raise my kids. I tend to get very broody, and when I do, I start planning out the life I want to have in the next ten years. The idea is to settle down and have kids the moment it's financially feasible. And when I do, they're going to have alphabet and nursery rhyme posters on the walls of their rooms, I'm going to read traditional old fairytales to them, and teach them nursery rhymes...

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there are some nursery songs that are incredibly disturbing, like mary mary... don't teach your kids them...

.. quite contrary, how does your garden grow?

In what way is that disturbing? Especially to a child?

"how does your garden grow" = are you pregnant
"silver bells..." = catholicism
"pretty maids all in a row" = still born babies buried in the garden
i find it disturbing anyway...

Yeah, 'cause that's really likely to disturb little kids...

it disturbed me and i have the mental age of a little kid

eh..
they all have some kind of background to them.
"Rock A-Bye Baby" is about the English Civil War.
kids don't get it, and probably wouldn't care. c'est la vie.

"ring-a-ring-a-roses" is about the plague too.

I'm not a kid and I still don't think nursery rhymes have any dark meaning at all. I can't imagine a childhood without nursery rhymes!

"humpty-dumpty" is also about the english civil war...
but i still find "mary mary" really disturbing...

You're the second person who's said that to me in as many days... ;o)

in my DevPsych module last term as well, we learnt how kids who have a grasp of rhyming and word patterns, like those are taught in nursery rhymes can have a positive effect on their reading skills...another bonus in my eyes...

love nursey rhymes

i still have this incredible illustrated book full of nursery rhymes from when i was little. I remember having it and not being able to read the words so I just looked at the pictures.

woo

Jamie kids... dear god :)

(but yeah, the whole nursery rhymes etc thing i agree with)

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